Tarts

Mimosa Tart

My favorite thing to do with citrus: pour some champagne and make a mimosa! ๐Ÿ˜€ As such, I couldn’t think of a better way to mark the last hurrah of citrus season than with this Mimosa Tart!

mimosa tart

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This Mimosa Tart has a sweet, orange-scented pastry crust filled with champagne pastry cream, and topped with candied citrus slices! It definitely works well as a dessert, but I think you could serve it at a brunch, too!

mimosa tart

Mimosas are traditionally made with orange (like I did with my Mimosa Cupcakes), but this time I wanted varying sizes and colors of citrus. I candied slices of a blood orange, pink grapefruit, navel orange, and meyer lemons to garnish the tart. Use whatever citrus you prefer! I kept the garnish simple for ease of cutting/serving the tart. I had plenty of leftover candied citrus to top the slices with as I served them.

mimosa tart

A few notes on ingredients:

The pastry flour ensures a very tender crust! If you can’t find it in your local grocery store, you can find it online (link here). If you choose not to use pastry flour, you can use all-purpose flour, but the crust will not be as tender.

I always have vanilla bean paste on-hand and find the flavor very similar to a fresh bean, so that’s what I use in my pastry cream. If you can’t find it at your local grocery store, you can find it online (see link here). If you don’t want to use vanilla bean or vanilla bean paste, you can add additional vanilla extract at the end of cooking the pastry cream.

mimosa tart

A few notes on hardware:

I used an 11″x7″ rectangular pan from my (ridiculously extensive) bakeware collection (like this one [here]). You can choose to make any size or shape tart that you like. If you’re making smaller tarts, the crust will bake in less time!

Pie weights help when blind-baking a crust, helping to keep the dough from rising/getting bubbles as it bakes. You can buy actual pie weights if you’d like (like these here), but I just use black beans. They’re cheap and you can use them over and over again.

mimosa tart

Goodbye, citrus season! Thank you for brightening chilly days! On to spring and summer baking…I’ll be sure to let you know what I come up with! ๐Ÿ™‚

Other posts you may like:

Blood Orange Curd Tartlets

Classic Fruit Tart

Blood Orange Cheesecake

Mimosa Cupcakes

Blood Orange & White Wine Jello

Cereal Milk Tartlets

mimosa tart

Mimosa Tart

Amee
An orange-scented sweet pastry crust filled with champagne pastry cream and topped with candied citrus. A mimosa in dessert form!
Course Dessert
Cuisine Tarts
Servings 8 slices

Ingredients
  

Candied Citrus:

  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 Tbsp agave syrup (or light corn syrup)
  • assorted citrus, sliced (see note)

Sweet Pastry:

  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • pinch salt
  • 1 egg
  • 1 Tbsp orange zest
  • 1 1/2 cups pastry flour

Champagne Reduction:

  • 1/3 cup champagne

Champagne Pastry Cream:

  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1 cup heavy (whipping) cream
  • 1/2 cup sugar, divided
  • 1 Tbsp vanilla bean paste (see note)
  • pinch salt
  • 6 egg yolks
  • 1/4 cup cornstarch
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 4 Tbsp unsalted butter, diced and softened (1/2 stick)
  • 3 Tbsp champagne reduction

Instructions
 

For Candied Citrus:

  • Combine sugar, water, and agave syrup (or light corn syrup) in a large skillet. Warm over low heat until sugar is dissolved.
  • Add citrus slices in a single layer and simmer until translucent, about 1 hour 15 minutes. If too much liquid evaporates and it becomes too thick/syrupy, you can add a few tablespoons of water. BE CAREFUL if you do so, as the mixture will bubble an spatter when you add the water.
  • Once translucent, remove the citrus slices from the pan with a slotted spoon and place on a wire rack to cool. I put a piece of parchment paper under the cooling rack to catch any syrup that drips off to save myself the counter cleanup later. Cool candied citrus slices completely.

For Pastry:

  • In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine butter, sugar, and salt. Mix on low speed just until combined, then increase speed to medium and beat until light and fluffy. Scrape down the sides of the bowl.
  • Add egg and orange zest, mixing to incorporate. Scrape down the sides of the bowl.
  • With the mixer on low speed, add the pastry flour. Mix just until the dough starts to come together.
  • Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead a few times (the more you handle the dough, the less tender it will be!) until the dough is smooth. Form the dough into a disk, wrap in plastic, and refrigerate 30 minutes.
  • Spray pan with nonstick spray. Set aside.
  • After the dough has chilled, place on a lightly floured surface. Roll to desired shape (see note). The dough should be about 1/8″ thick and about 1″ larger than the pan you are using.
  • Roll dough up onto the rolling pin, position next to pan, and then unroll the pastry into the pan. Avoid stretching the dough, as it can cause it to shrink while baking. Trim the edges of the dough. Patch any tears or holes in the dough with the excess.
  • Dock the dough with a fork and freeze 20 minutes. While the dough is chilling, preheat oven to 375F.
  • Remove crust from the freezer, line with foil or parchment paper, and fill with pie weights (see note). Bake crust 18 minutes, then remove the foil/parchment and pie weights. Return to the oven to bake an additional 8-10 minutes, or until golden.
  • Allow crust to cool completely on a wire rack.

Champagne Reduction:

  • Pour champagne into a small saucepan. Over medium-high heat, reduce champagne to about 2 tablespoons in volume. Reduction will be syrupy.

For Pastry Cream:

  • In a medium saucepan, combine milk, cream, 1/4 cup sugar, vanilla bean paste (see note), and salt. Cook mixture oven over medium heat until it reaches a boil. Remove from the heat.
  • In a small bowl, combine cornstarch, 1/4 cup sugar, and egg yolks. Whisk until smooth.
  • Using a measuring cup, pour about one cup of the hot cream mixture into the egg mixture, whisking constantly. This step tempers the eggs. Once the mixture is combined, pour the tempered egg mixture into the saucepan with the cream mixture.
  • Cook pastry cream over medium heat, stirring constantly, until it just starts to boil. Mixture will thicken as it cooks.
  • Remove the pan from the heat, and whisk the pastry cream until it cools slightly. Beat in butter, vanilla extract, and champagne reduction.
  • Pour the pastry cream into a medium bowl. Cover with plastic, pressing the wrap to the surface of the pastry cream to ensure it doesn’t form a skin. Refrigerate until completely cooled.

For Assembly:

  • Fill cooled crust with pastry cream, smoothing the top. Tope with candied citrus slices (see note on preparing in advance).
    Enjoy!

Notes

Note on citrus: I wanted many shades of red/orange/yellow for this tart, so I chose a variety of citrus: a blood orange, pink grapefruit, navel orange, and meyer lemons. Because of the varying colors, I halved the recipe for the sugar syrup and simmered the different citrus in two smaller skillets (so that my blood oranges didn’t make my meyer lemons pink/red). You can use whatever citrus you prefer!
Note on pastry flour: Pastry flour ensures a very tender crust! If you can’t find it in your local grocery store, you can find it online (link here). If you choose not to use pastry flour, you can use all-purpose flour, but the crust will not be as tender.
Note on vanilla bean paste: The original recipe calls for one whole vanilla bean to be split, and the seeds added to the cream mixture before cooking. I always have vanilla bean paste on-hand and find the flavor very similar to a fresh bean, so that’s what I use. If you don’t want to use vanilla bean or vanilla bean paste, you can add additional vanilla extract at the end of cooking the pastry cream. That said, I highly recommend the vanilla bean paste, as it has better flavor than extract, and is more convenient (and cheaper!) than whole beans. If you can’t find it at your local grocery store, you can find it online (see link here).
Note on pan: I used an 11″x7″ rectangular pan from my (ridiculously extensive) bakeware collection (like this one here). You can choose to make any size or shape tart that you like. If you’re making smaller tarts, the crust will bake in less time!
Note on pie weights: Pie weights help when blind-baking a crust, helping to keep the dough from rising/getting bubbles as it bakes. This makes sure that you have the room that you need for filling. You can buy actual pie weights if you’d like (like these here), but I just use black beans. They’re cheap and you can use them over and over again.
Note on assembly: If you won’t be serving the tart within a few hours, you’re best off to wrap the crust tightly in plastic, store the pastry cream in the refrigerator, and assemble closer to time to serve. The pastry cream will make the crust soggy over time.

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